Archives for November 2008

Earth Science Projects

earth science project topic

Tumble your rocks by clicking here!

An earth science project demonstration project for an elementary school student is rock tumbling. Smithsonian’s quality rock tumbler uncovers the secrets under the surface of ordinary rocks, revealing amazing colors and patterns with a glass-like finish. Place a few of the included gemstone rocks in the tumbler with some of the included grinding powder, and wait for the beautiful results! The kit also provides materials to make keychains, jewelry and other crafts. This kit is easy enough for anelementary school student’s earth science project.
physics science project topic

Click here to build your own engine!

 

When physical science is your earth science project topic, you can build the ultimate engine with the Motor-Works Engine Kit! This science project kit creates a real working battery-powered 4-cylinder model engine with lights and sounds. You will be able to observe the spark plugs fire, and the valves open and close. You will also see how the pistons fire with the correct timing. This kit is particularly suited for the earth science project for middle school.

electricity science project kit

Click here to see the Super Circuit Lab

 

Electricity makes a great earth science project topic, You can build over 20 fascinating circuits with the Super Circuit Lab, ! Designed especially for young people interested in learning about, playing with, and, most of all, having FUN with basic electric circuits, the Super Circuit Lab allows you to make your own motor, buzzer, alarm, resister, and light circuits, starting with the simple and moving on toward the complex. You’ll find lots of earth science project ideas inside!


NEED MORE IDEAS? CHECK OUT 24 HOUR SCIENCE PROJECTS! CLICK HERE!

Science Project Ideas

science project ideaScience project ideas aren’t easy to come up with. Here are some hints to help you choose the best science project for your child:

1. Check the science guidelines. What kind of project does your science fair require? There are five kinds of science projects: investigative (experimental), demonstration, research papers or reports, models, and collections. (For more information on all the types of science projects, get a FREE Parent’s Guide to a Science Project at www.24hourscienceprojects.com).

Are there restrictions on projects? Is there a ‘money spend’ limit? Can you use animals or food in the experiment or in the display? Does your child have to demonstrate the project for a judge?

fifth grade science project2. After you know all the particulars for your science fair, make a list or projects ideas that meet the requirements. Try to get projects with a variety of science topics. You may want to do this before your child gets involved, so you won’t have to say “No – not suitable” so many times.

3. Look through your list of science project ideas, and eliminate the ones that look too complicated or hard to do. Remember, your child is supposed to do the project with your assistance only.

Check the list of supplies. Are they readily available? Are they affordable?

Do you have enough time to complete the project? If the science project is due next week, you don’t have time to study the long term effect of anything.

Make sure the science you you are learning about is on your child’s level. Your child should be able to have a basic idea of the underlying scientific principles. Science projects for elementary school students probably shouldn’t involve advanced biology.

4. Finally, let your child choose the science project idea that he or she likes the best.

And have fun with your new science project idea!

STILL NEED AN IDEA? CLICK HERE!

P.S. Find out how to get a FREE Parent’s Guide to a Science Project at www.24hourscienceprojects.com.

Vitamin C – Using an Indicator

When you mix Iodine and Vitamin C (the scienctific name is ascorbic acid), something interesting happens; the solution turns blue for a bit, then returns to the color of the juice. Keep adding the iodine, however, and the mixture will turn a very inky dark blue color. Why is this? Here’s a kid friendly explanation!

Iodine and vitamin C like each other, and when they are put in the same container, they will combine. When you are adding the iodine to the juice and the starch mixture, as long as there is still vitamin C that has not been combined with the iodine, the color will stay the color of the juice, but after you reach the equivalence point- when you have added as much iodine as there is vitamin C – then the iodine starts combining with the cornstarch. When iodine combines with cornstarch it turns blue.

And if you’re doing our award winning experiment Vitamin “C”itrus, here’s a hint: the more iodine it takes, the more vitamin C there is.

START WORKING ON AN AWARD-WINNING PROJECT TODAY! CLICK HERE!

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Ideas for Human Behavior Science Projects

Human Behavior Science Projects explore the fascinating ways that human being behave. There are so many things to discover, that the hardest part may be simply choosing a topic. Here’s a list of ideas to get you started.
1. Determine the soothing effect of music by taking the pulse before and after a five minute session.
2. Find out if two ears or one are better at localizing a sound by hiding an object, and timing how long individuals take to find it. (Get a complete project guide for this project at Online Science Projects.)
3. See if wearing glasses helps or hurts sales by counting profit.
4. Find out if yawning is contagious behavior by watching a group of children before and after the group leader yawns.
5. Do younger children like their teachers more than older students? Rate the popularity of teachers that teach multiple ages of kids.
6. Measure the time it takes for children to learn a poem set to music or not set to music.
7. Find out if the scent of lemon helps attention by calculating test scores of people who have or have not sniffed a lemon.
8. See if more people are visual learners or auditory learners by having humans memorize a telephone number that they see or that they hear.
Of course, any study of human behavior will show that students like to come up with new and unique ideas. So put on your thinking cap and come up with your own project! If you need help, check out our free parent guide called “If It’s My Child’s Project, Why am I Doing all the Work?” For finding places to gather your experiment participants, see yesterday’s blog. And let us know what you come up with by emailing scienceideas AT 24hourscienceprojects.com. We’d love to hear what you chose to do for your human behavior science project.

GET A SCIENCE PROJECT THAT YOU CAN FINISH BY TOMORROW! CLICK HERE!

Human Behavior Science Projects

Human Behavior Science Projects explore the fascinating ways that human being behave. There are so many things to discover, that the hardest part may be simply choosing a topic. Here’s a list of ideas to get you started.
1. Determine the soothing effect of music by taking the pulse before and after a five minute session.
2. Find out if two ears or one are better at localizing a sound by hiding an object, and timing how long individuals take to find it. (Get a complete project guide for this project at Online Science Projects.)
3. See if wearing glasses helps or hurts sales by counting profit.
4. Find out if yawning is contagious behavior by watching a group of children before and after the group leader yawns.
5. Do younger children like their teachers more than older students? Rate the popularity of teachers that teach multiple ages of kids.
6. Measure the time it takes for children to learn a poem set to music or not set to music.
7. Find out if the scent of lemon helps attention by calculating test scores of people who have or have not sniffed a lemon.
8. See if more people are visual learners or auditory learners by having humans memorize a telephone number that they see or that they hear.
Of course, any study of human behavior will show that students like to come up with new and unique ideas. So put on your thinking cap and come up with your own project! If you need help, check out our free parent guide called “If It’s My Child’s Project, Why am I Doing all the Work?” For finding places to gather your experiment participants, see yesterday’s blog. And let us know what you come up with by emailing scienceideas AT 24hourscienceprojects.com. We’d love to hear what you chose to do for your human behavior science project.

GET STARTED ON A GREAT SCIENCE PROJECT TODAY! CLICK HERE!

Chemical Change Science Projects

As students head to middle and high school, they are expected to do more advanced science projects. Many kids like to do an experiment with a dramatic chemical change. We have a couple of chemical change science projects that our boys have done. These are slightly more advanced, yet still have easy to find supplies and are relatively easy to do.
Our most popular project involving chemicals is Vitamin “C”itrus. This experiment determines which fruit has the most vitamin C. A simple indicator is made, and students (and parents) enjoy watching the chemical reaction that occurs along with titration, which is a fancy way of saying “putting in drops”. This project can be modified in several different ways, allowing your student’s creativity to shine. We get letters from many students telling us that Vitamin “C”itrus was submitted to the fair, and was winning science project.
Another great science project involving a chemical change is our project The Yeast Beast. This project is so much fun to watch that our kids did it over and over until we ran out of yeast. Students watch what happens when yeast ‘eats’ sugar. This project is marketed as a demonstration project, but we also offer instructions to do it as an experiment.
Of course, for more great ideas, head to 24 Hour Science Projects. We have all sorts of ideas for your scientist, starting at the most elementary, and working up to the more advanced chemical change science projects.

GET STARTED ON AN AWESOME CHEMICAL CHANGE PROJECT TODAY! CLICK HERE!