Finding a Science Fair Project

science fair project “I need a science fair project.”

You’ve probably arrived at this website because one of your children has made this bone chilling statement. Finding a science fair project can turn a mother who bravely endured 18 hours of labor into a quivering mass of nerves. If they could bottle the feeling induced by a science fair project, it could be sold as birth control. Parents hate them that much.

We know. Our family stopped counting after science fair project # 25.

We struggled for years to submit a science fair project that was easy and affordable to do, yet would satisfy the strict guidelines set forth by our schools. After a dozen projects, we found some science projects that worked for us. The first year, we submitted two versions of the same science project – one for the middle school science fair, and the other to elementary school. Over the next few years, we added to our collection, and figured out how to do terrific science fair project charts and displays. We discovered great resources for doing a science fair project – resources that helped our boys do research easily.

A couple of years ago, knowing that other families have the same problems doing a science fair project, we decided to make our science fair projects available to others. We picked five of our best science projects and made them into a package of project guides that can be done in only 24 hours. Really.

We’ve been in your shoes – in fact, we’re still in them, because our boys are still participating in science fairs! We enjoy helping others discover that a science fair project can really be fun. Finding a science project doesn’t have to be hard! Take a look at our project guide here. We know you’ll find that we’ve done the hard part, and left the fun of a science fair project for you to enjoy!

Three Cool Science Fair Projects from 2011 Science Fairs

You can read about cool science fair projects that were used in recent science fairs to get some great ideas for this year.

cool science fair projectsI found myself reading about some cool science project ideas from Google Alerts, as we like to keep track of what is going on in the science fair world, and I found a couple that fit right in with what we teach at 24 hour science projects. The main thing I look for is that if they are quick and easy projects to do, and use common every day things you can find around the house.

One of the things we try to get across is that easy to do does not mean simple science. You can find some advanced science concepts that many people never quite get, but since the projects use things you find at home or a quick trip to the local store, that are easy to organize and do. Some of these can be done is as little asn one day and others take a little more time

Here are summaries of the three cool science fair projects I found from this past season:

  • Looking at mold and different kinds of bread: This is good because there are a variables you could zone in on to study mold. The ingredients are simple as can be, but you will need to do this over a period of days or weeks to keep track of the progress of the mold. Different bread types, temperatures, what you put on it, preservatives are just some of a long list of things you could study.
  • Magnetizing seeds to see if they germinate faster: You can read the details from the link, but this was cool because it came from a grandmothers old wives tail, about magnetizing the seeds they used back on the farm. This is another one that is simple to do, easy to record the data, but will take some time, to watch the germination.
  • Which paper towel is more absorbent: This would be a true 24 hour project because you can almost instantly judge how much water different brands of paper towel really absorb., or if single or double layered or ply make a difference, and even compare it to towels or sponges or whatever you want. Again, there are many variables you can test out with this kind of project, so as an idea starter

Notice that in our minds, these are cool science fair projects because each one of them uses common everyday household items like a stop watch, paper towels, bread, or magnets. Believe it or not you will notice that your kids tend to get more “in” projects when they can go rummaging in your cabinets and closets and find what they need themselves!

When you are dealing with a last minute project, where you don’t have much time you can find some really cool science fair projects that still use the scientific principles teachers require!

Grab your cool science fair projects with our kid tested and teacher approved 24 Hour Science Projects with this link.

 

Sixth Grade Science Projects

It can be a challenge when your 6th grader brings home that annual science project packet. First you start looking for a fun and educational project to do with your favorite middle school student. There are several places you can look to try to find age appropriate science project including the internet, your child’s teacher, and the public library. The most important thing is to use your resources to find a project you and your student can actually execute, and enjoy at the same time.

Next, one of the best places to begin finding 6th grade science projects is by talking with your child’s science teacher. They can give you advice based on your what the science class is currently studying, and can let you know if the project your child chooses fulfills the project requirements for the class. Their teacher might also be able to recommend a good science project book, which brings us to our next useful tool, the public library. The library is full of kid friendly science books, even books geared specifically toward science projects for any age. A great science project book might be helpful as you know you’d be using reliable information that will walk you through the experiment.

Lastly, the internet is a great resource for finding a 6th grade science project. Either by searching specifically for a type of project i.e. “6th grade science project, chemistry,” or by searching for a database full of science projects like http://www.akronlibrary.org/DBS/SFDB/Default.aspx or http://www.youth.net/nsrc/sci/sci.index.html, you’re sure to be able to find an assortment of science experiments that your child will be interested. Another great find on the internet is the free science project guide at http://www.middle-school-science-projects.com/guide.pdf .

Check out 24 Hour Science Projects today

and get your science experiment!

How to Find Science Experiments for Kids

great science project for kidsKids are always curious about how the world works, why things are the way they are, and how stuff works. By engaging their attention with a fun science experiment, you can help them understand the world around them, and hopefully have fun at the same time.  It might be tricky to know what experiments are best,  what materials you need, or what to look for in an experiment, unless you’re a teacher or scientist . Luckily, if you know where to look, you just might have access to lots of great kids science experiment ideas in places you visit everyday.

Your child’s teacher or science teacher might  be a great resource for finding a science experiment.  The teacher  can  help you find a kids science experiment idea that is relevant to what your child’s class is studying at that time.  Also, public libraries or school libraries often carry books geared toward children full of fun and age appropriate projects. Be sure to look for one with good instructions and pictures to help you along.   Finally, the internet has many websites geared toward science experiments for kids. Searching for kids science experiments will yield tons of helpful results,  many of which are free like the science project guides you can find http://www.24hourscienceprojects.com/guide.pdf. Remember to have fun by doing a project your child is interested in, and always be safe!

Get started on your kid’s science experiment today! Visit 24 Hour Science Projects!

Cool Science experiments

If you are looking for a cool science experiment, here are a few ideas to get you started.

Frozen bubbles.  This can be really fun for the younger age group.   Baking soda bubbles is also a neat experiment for the bubble enthusiast.

Food always makes for a cool experiment.  Some ideas include making light with fruit, plastic mild, moldy bred, and yeast.  You can also make your own butter in a jar and rock candy.  While you are considering the food category, why not do an experiment to see how much fat is in the food that you eat.

Experiments with animals are also a big hit.  How does variation in temperature affect animals?  Do animals prefer certain colors?  Do certain sounds deter bugs/and or animals?

Balloons always make cool experiments as well, and there are so many things that you can do with them.  Some of the options include; balloon blast off, balloon car, balloon boat, straws and balloons, and balloon columns.

Some other neat miscellaneous experiments include; how water pressure works, using food coloring to change to color of certain flowers, and homemade silly putty.

If you have a young nature enthusiast, you could try making your own little green house in a bottle.  You may also want to consider making a fossil for your science project.

There are countless other cool science experiments out there; it just takes a little research to discover the perfect one for your student.

If you’re looking for a ready made experiment, get one of our Science Project guides. They’ll take you step by step through the experiments, all of which follow the scientific method.

SO GRAB A SCIENCE PROJECT GUIDE FROM 24 HOUR SCIENCE PROJECTS! CLICK HERE!

photo source:  wimzz

School Science Projects

At least once every year, parents get a letter from their child’s teacher informing them that it is time to create the ever famous science project.  Although this may send fear through the minds of most, it doesn’t have to be a scary process.  School science projects can be fun; if you choose one that both you and your child are comfortable with.

Some of the things to consider when deciding on a school science project are; level of difficulty, amount of time required, amount of materials needed, and interest level for your child.

Depending on the age and grade level of your child there are a wide range of experiments to choose from.  For younger children things like the celery root experiment, the cornstarch suspension experiment, and the egg in a bottle experiment.  All three are simple enough for young children, but interesting enough to get everyone involved excited.

For middle school children you will want something a little more complex.  Experiments that work well in this situation are; the music and plants experiment, sundial experiment, the bubble bomb, and the egg floatation experiment.

When your child reaches high school the experiments may become a little more difficult, but still not impossible.  Some ideas for high school experiments include; solar energy experiments, corrosion experiments, the effects that different components have on plant germination.

No matter what grade your child may be in, one of the most important tips to remember is choose something that they are interested in, this will keep them motivated and dedicated to the project.

If you’re looking for a ready made experiment, get one of our Science Project guides. They’ll take you step by step through the experiments, all of which follow the scientific method.

READY TO GET STARTED ON A SCIENCE PROJECT? CLICK HERE FOR 5 FAST, EASY GUIDES!

photo source: misscglass

Winning Science Projects – A Straight Flush

We’ve got a lot of winning science projects in our collection of guides. One of our favorite winners is A Straight Flush. This experiment compares the biodegradability of different types of bathroom tissue, and can be classified as a consumer or and environmental science project. winning science projects

Some students choose to compare brands of tissue, and others choose to compare types – like one or two ply, scented or non, or pre-moistened. To do this project, you need tissue samples, a scale with close tolerances (that means it shows the weight in very small increments – like ounces or milligrams), jars, water, and a screen. We used the scale at the post office, and yes, we did get some funny looks weighing toilet paper tissue. You could possibly also use the scale at the grocery store or pharmacist if you ask nicely and flash a winning smile.

a straight flush science project

To do this, you weigh the tissue samples, soak them in water for a period of time, ‘flush’ them through a funnel, let the non-flushed tissue dry, then compare the weight of the pre-soaked tissue to the post-soaked tissue. It’s a very easy and inexpensive project to do. It’s fun and you’ll learn a lot. And, yes, it has been a winner at the science fair!

To get step by step instructions for this experiment – plus reference materials and pre-formatted graphs/charts, get our package of science project guides. Our guides can’t guarantee you’ll win at the science fair, but if you ask us – any time you learn something and learn to love science more – you have a winning science project!

 

This is a 24 Hour Science Project: Get yours now by clicking here, and be finished by this time tomorrow!

Creating an Experiment from a Model, or Demonstration

Elementary and middle school science projects almost always have to be done in the form of an experiment. The trouble for most students is that most of the time, projects that are on the internet or in books are either demonstrations or models. Since they don’t follow the scientific method, neither of these meet the qualifications of the school science fair.

The good news is that many times, a model can be used in an experiment, and variables can be added to a demonstration, so that it can be one, too. Here are five examples of projects that are modified to become an experiment.

– How hot can a solar heater get? – First of all, finding the answer to this question may result in a fire! Make it an experiment by testing two different solar heater models. Construct two identical heaters, one with a glass front, and the other with a plexiglass front. (The instructions are live here.) Measure the temperature over several days, and see which one got the hottest.

– How can you make a potato canon? – This is a fun activity, and it demonstrates how cool science can be, but it doesn’t test anything. How can you turn it into an experiment? Vary the trajectory, and ask, “At which angle will a potato canon launch a potato the farthest?”

– What happens when you mix chalk and lemon juice? – Studying acids and bases is fascinating, but there are no variables – so it’s not an experiment. Change it up. Soak pieces of chalk in water, a basic solution, and an acid, and note the variance in the weight.

– What happens when bean seeds germinate? – This is a great lesson, but what are kids comparing? Turn it into an experiment by testing “At which temperature do bean seeds germinate the best?” Use different watt bulbs to vary the temperature.

– How do bones change when soaked in vinegar? – This is close to an experiment, but the project I saw didn’t have a way to measure the change. The results of a true experiment must be measurable. Come up with a weigh to measure the amount of weight the bones can support before breaking, and you may just win your middle school science fair.

Remember, an experiment is a test of the relationship between two variables that have measurable results that can be replicated. It amazes me that reputable science publications will label any sort of science activity as an experiment. It doesn’t matter that you’re still in middle school type of project isn’t right. You can do better than ‘real’ scientists! Turn a ‘non-experiments’ into middle school projects that will amaze judges, your teachers – and yourself!

If you’re looking for a ready made experiment, get one of our Science Project guides. They’ll take you step by step through the experiments, all of which follow the scientific method.

Don’t wait! Start today and finish tomorrow: 24 Hour Science Projects!

They’re LIVE – Middle School Science Projects!

We’re happy to report that Middle School Science Projects are now live! As you know, we’ve been working like – well – mad scientists at our house, and we can’t wait for you to choose your favorite project and start experimenting!soil science project

Here are the five projects in the Middle School Science Project package:

• Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow – Experiment to find the effect different hair products has on hair. You can test different conditioners or different ways to color hair. Most of the supplies for this project are as close your bathroom – and the head on your head!

• “C” You Later – This project teaches you how to make an indicator, and then use it to see if the amount of Vitamin C in juice diminishes over time. There are a ton of variations for this science project, and we tell you about them in the guide. This project has already won awards at science fairs.

• Yeast – Rising to the Occasion – Find out what makes yeast grow the best. Sugar, wheat, or maybe dog food!? This easy experiment always is amazing to do – and sharing it makes it even more fun. Hint: It would make a wonderful video to go along with your science board.

• Cheap Heats – You’ll get plans on how to make a solar heater from inexpensive or free products. We actually made one version of this project for zero dollars – scavenging in our attic and recycling bin for supplies! It was loads of fun to do, and we were warmed by the results.

• The Dirt on Dirt – Dig up some soil from your yard, analyze it, then test its water carrying capacity. We loved doing this earth science project! To do it, you only need dirt, water, nylon stockings, one tin can and some jars. We learned a ton doing the research for this project – and you will too!

But you shouldn’t take our word for it. Grab your copy of Middle School Science Projects today and get started on your next science experiment.

P.S. You can also find out how to get five MORE science project guides – a bargain if there ever was one.

Kids Science Experiments

kids science experiment mouseBecause we’re getting ready to roll out our new package of middle school science projects, I’ve been looking all over for good kids’ science experiments. Trust me, true experiments are not easy to find! It amazes me that reputable science publications will label any sort of science activity as an experiment. An experiment is a test of the relationship between two variables that have measurable results that can be replicated.

Here are some things I’ve found that are great science fair topics, but simply are not science experiments:

~ Making a Potato Canon – This is a fun activity, and it demonstrates how cool science can be, but it doesn’t tst anything. How can you turn it into an experiment? Vary the trajectory, and ask, “At which angle will a potato canon launch a potato the farthest?”

~ What happens when seeds germinate?” – This is listed as an experiment on a teachers’ forum. Can’t believe it. It’s a great lesson, but what are kids comparing here?! Turn it into an experiment by testing “At which temperature do seeds germinate the best?”

~ How do bones change when soaked in vinegar? – This is close to an experiment, but the project I saw didn’t have a way to measure the change. The results of a true experiment must be measurable. If your kids come up with a weigh to measure the amount of weight the bones can support before breaking – you may just have a winning kids science experiment.

That gives me a great idea for another science project experiment, actually…Stay tuned!

 

P.S. ALL of the projects at 24 Hour Science Projects are experiment based – Hypothesis, Variables, Measurable Results and all!