Dirty Laundry Lessons

Science at Home:  Dirty Laundry Lessons, Part 1

It shouldn’t have come as a shock to my family that I went to college and majored in a scientific field.  After all, I showed an early proclivity for experimentation, long before the days of chemistry class or science fair projects.  At the ripe age of 9, I conducted an “experiment” to see what types of materials burn faster.  (NOTE:  Do NOT try this at home, or at least not without extreme adult supervision!!)  All went well until I tested a Kleenex…which I promptly had to drop into the metal trash can…filled with Kleenex…well, you get the picture.  A few seconds later and after a mad fire stomp by several members of my family (Metal trash cans get hot when engulfed in flame and cannot be carried out of the house; that was my mom’s take home lesson), my first science lab was finished.  As was the carpet.  Not a stellar start to my science career, but it didn’t slow me down.  Much. 

However, I would like to suggest some fun and SAFER “science-y” things to do at home.  These ideas can be used as a simple introduction to the scientific method, or you can take it further and use it as a starting board for a full-blown science project.  First off, we’ll start in the laundry room, since I seem to spend a large portion of my life there! 

1)  What are the effects of hard/soft water on detergents?  Or, what are the effects of certain salts on detergents?  To do this experiment, create a universal stain on several cloth strips(all made of same material).  Be sure to leave some material unstained as a point of comparison.  To create a consistent stain, consider soaking in something like grape juice or coffee.  Stain all the material at the same time for the same amount of time.  Start with ½ liter of purified water in several 2 Liter bottles (this will be your washing machine).  Leave one “machine” as purified water only.  This is your control.  To each of the other two liters, add salts.  You can try different salts (Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium), OR try using different amounts of the same salt in different two liters.  Add a cloth strip and the same amount of detergent to each “machine.”  I recommend using only a teaspoon of detergent.  Count the number of shakes (do whatever your arms can handle; but do your best to shake each two liter the same amount of time/number of shakes).  

Oh, my mind races with the possibilities with this one:  comparing detergents, amounts of salts, lather, time, etc.  However, try to keep it simple.  Only test one thing at a time. 

Well, tune in next time for more laundry lab.  Who knows, if nothing else, you might get Suzie or Johnny interested in science and the upcoming science fair.  Or, at the very least, maybe they’ll do the laundry for you next time!

Yours in Science,
Cecilia
PS:  Want more details on a quick, easy science project….

Check out 24 Hour Science Projects!

Searching the Internet for Kids Science Experiments

If your school has a science fair or requires the completion of a science project as part of their curriculum, the internet might be your most useful tool.   A great way to engage your energetic and inquisitive kid, is to do your own at-home science project.

You can easily search online and find databases of detailed science projects for your kid.  When narrowing the search, be specific, for example, if your child is studying or is interested in earth sciences, a search for “kid’s science experiments, earth science” might yield projects about earthquakes, erosion models, or studies of how fossils are made.

Search more generally for science experiment databases like those found at http://www.akronlibrary.org/DBS/SFDB/Default.aspx or http://www.youth.net/nsrc/sci/sci.index.html. There you can search a massive inventory of science experiments with more specific parameters like the grade your child is in, the type of experiment, or field of science. If you don’t have time to browse through too large a database, a great sure bet is the science project guide at  https://www.24hourscienceprojects.com/guide.pdf, a wonderful resource for finding kids science experiments on the internet. 24 Hour Science Projects are also great as they come complete with the entire topic headers typically used in school science projects such as purpose, hypothesis, procedure, observations, results, and conclusion. 

Find a great experiment for them to have fun doing, no matter what your child’s specific interests.

Go to 24 Hour Science Projects

and get your child’s science experiment today!

School Science Projects

At least once every year, parents get a letter from their child’s teacher informing them that it is time to create the ever famous science project.  Although this may send fear through the minds of most, it doesn’t have to be a scary process.  School science projects can be fun; if you choose one that both you and your child are comfortable with.

Some of the things to consider when deciding on a school science project are; level of difficulty, amount of time required, amount of materials needed, and interest level for your child.

Depending on the age and grade level of your child there are a wide range of experiments to choose from.  For younger children things like the celery root experiment, the cornstarch suspension experiment, and the egg in a bottle experiment.  All three are simple enough for young children, but interesting enough to get everyone involved excited.

For middle school children you will want something a little more complex.  Experiments that work well in this situation are; the music and plants experiment, sundial experiment, the bubble bomb, and the egg floatation experiment.

When your child reaches high school the experiments may become a little more difficult, but still not impossible.  Some ideas for high school experiments include; solar energy experiments, corrosion experiments, the effects that different components have on plant germination.

No matter what grade your child may be in, one of the most important tips to remember is choose something that they are interested in, this will keep them motivated and dedicated to the project.

If you’re looking for a ready made experiment, get one of our Science Project guides. They’ll take you step by step through the experiments, all of which follow the scientific method.

READY TO GET STARTED ON A SCIENCE PROJECT? CLICK HERE FOR 5 FAST, EASY GUIDES!

photo source: misscglass

“It’s Elementary” Science Projects

Elementary Science Projects are tricky. On one hand, you want a science project that your child can do and understand – so it can’t be too hard. On the other hand, you need a project that your teacher will accept – and it can’t be too easy.

We’ve got a suggestion – Undercover Sneeze! This science project is great for early elementary students. It deals with the health – on a subject elementary kids are very familiar with – covering your mouth when you sneeze.

Undercover Sneeze simulates what happens when someone sneezes. It measures the spread of ‘germs’ with hands and without.

Germs are mimicked by making paper punches and loading them into an inflated balloon. The balloon is popped – which represents the sneeze, and the punches scatter like germs do. Students measure the distance that the punches spread.

Two sets of trials are performed for this science project. For one set, paper ‘hands’ are set up around the balloon, simulating a hand held in front of the mouth.

For a first elementary science project, this is an easy experiment that kids can do on their own. They learn to form an hypothesis, to follow a procedure, to keep up with data (it’s just counting!), and to form a conclusion. The project is easy to do, and although they’ll need an adult to supervise, the kids can do the entire project by themselves. A true example of what you’re looking for in elementary science projects.

 

Get step by step instructions for this awesome project from our 24 Hour Science Projects Package!

Science Project Topics

science fair topics for middle school

Watch for whole new set of science project with science fair topics that are perfect for middle school! In fact, the projects are called Middle School Science Projects. There will be some cool experiments, and one demonstration. Here are the topics that are planned:

1. How do different hair products affect the strength of hair. Girls are especially interested in doing a science project about hair. In this project, you will treat hair, then test its strength.

2. Does the amount of Vitamin C in Orange juice change over time? This is a slightly more advanced version of the popular Vitamin ‘C’itrus’ project.

3. What liquid is best for growing beans. This experiment involves pH and hydroponics, and you get to make your own litmus paper.

4. What makes yeast grow best? This is a project with yeast as the science fair topic, but its a demonstration.

5. This one is a demonstration/model. We’ll be building a solar heater with cans and a window frame.

PS You don’t have to wait for the new package. Get a free science project guide here.

Elementary Science Projects

elementary science ProjectsElementary School teachers almost always require students to do at least one science project before they finish the fifth grade. Elementary science projects are easy to find, but finding the right project for your child can be a challenge. Here are five hints to help you find the best project for your grade school child.

1. Find out what type of project your science teacher requires. There are many types of projects, and most elementary schools give a range of choices. Does your teacher want an experiment, a demonstration, a collection, a report, or a model? Knowing what kind of project you need will narrow down your choices considerably.

2. Make a list of things that interest your child. What subjects catch your child’s eye on television or in books – space, animals, buildings, computers, explosions? Does your child need instant gratification? Consider a chemistry experiment with dramatic results, such as “Which Fruit has the Most Vitamin C?” Is your child concerned about the environment? Find out which toilet tissue is most biodegradable, or which type of insulation works best.

3. Set your budget for money – and time. If you don’t have a lot of money to invest, and if your time is limited, there is no need to look at anything that requires special metals to be imported from the Far East. Decide on how much cash you’re willing to spend, and create a generous time line for getting supplies. Keep in mind that you have to actually do the project after the supplies arrive.

4. Keep in mind that this is a science project for elementary school. Don’t choose a project with complicated instructions. You want your child to do the project with your help – and not the other way around.

5. Provide four or five science project choices. Ever notice how it takes longer to decide on an ice cream flavor when there are 31 flavors? Give your elementary school child a limited list of science project choices, and you’ll both be happier.

Parents, get a free guide to science projects– including how to find experiments with step by step instructions – at 24 Hour Science Projects.

Our project guides are easy and fast, and will help you submit an outstanding – and maybe winning – science project for elementary school.

Elementary Science Projects

elementary science ProjectsElementary School teachers almost always require students to do at least one science project before they finish the fifth grade. Elementary science projects are easy to find, but finding the right project for your child can be a challenge. Here are five hints to help you find the best project for your grade school child.

1. Find out what type of project your science teacher requires. There are many types of projects, and most elementary schools give a range of choices. Does your teacher want an experiment, a demonstration, a collection, a report, or a model? Knowing what kind of project you need will narrow down your choices considerably.

2. Make a list of things that interest your child. What subjects catch your child’s eye on television or in books – space, animals, buildings, computers, explosions? Does your child need instant gratification? Consider a chemistry experiment with dramatic results, such as “Which Fruit has the Most Vitamin C?” Is your child concerned about the environment? Find out which toilet tissue is most biodegradable, or which type of insulation works best.

3. Set your budget for money – and time. If you don’t have a lot of money to invest, and if your time is limited, there is no need to look at anything that requires special metals to be imported from the Far East. Decide on how much cash you’re willing to spend, and create a generous time line for getting supplies. Keep in mind that you have to actually do the project after the supplies arrive.

4. Keep in mind that this is a science project for elementary school. Don’t choose a project with complicated instructions. You want your child to do the project with your help – and not the other way around.

5. Provide four or five science project choices. Ever notice how it takes longer to decide on an ice cream flavor when there are 31 flavors? Give your elementary school child a limited list of science project choices, and you’ll both be happier.

Parents, get a free guide to science projects– including how to find experiments with step by step instructions – at Elementary Science Projects.

Our project guides are easy and fast, and will help you submit an outstanding – and maybe winning – science project for elementary school.

SO, CLICK HERE TO GET ACCESS TO 24 HOUR SCIENCE PROJECTS!

Elementary Science Projects

an elementary science projectElementary Science Projects are often the first introduction that a parent has to the wonderful world of school projects. The first science project is the perfect time for a kid to be amazed at the way things work in the world around us. Learning about stuff like friction, static electricity and fire is fascinating and fun. Often, however, the process of deciding on a topic, finding a project, and getting it to work leads to frustration for parents and students. Somewhere between the fun and the fair, the fun often evaporates with that first science project. It shouldn’t be that way! A science project should be a wonderful time of discovery and learning for a parent and child.

But what if you’re like most parents, and are not a rocket scientist? How can you choose and help your child do a good, if elementary, science project?

Before you discuss it with your child, do your homework. If your elementary school child has been assigned a science project, you already know that your biggest step is choosing a topic. Don’t make the mistake of being too broad and asking your child, “Do you want to do a project about electricity?” Find some specific projects that follow guidelines of your science teacher or science fair. Then, describe the project in exciting terms. “Here’s a cool project about how yeast has enough gas – yes, that kind – to can blow up a balloon!” or “You take the shell off an egg in this project and then bounce the egg on the floor!”

While looking for an experiment, keep in mind that many teachers require that a science project follow the scientific method, even when doing an elementary school science project. That means your child has to come up with a question, do research, state an hypothesis, list independent and dependent variables, test the hypothesis, chart results and declare a conclusion. (Did you feel the fun start to go away?!)

It’s also important not to choose a science project so complicated that the child is only a spectator. Find an experiment that allows the child to participate, to understand the scientific principles, and to have fun!

Yes, we know how difficult this can be. We have four sons, and have done more science projects than we can count. We’ve encountered more than our share of problems, and made lots of mistakes. But somewhere along the way, we started to figure it out! We began to come up with project ideas that met the teacher’s standards, yet were easy to do, affordable, interesting and fun. We’ve written a free guide called, “The Non-Scientist Parent’s Guide to Science Fair Projects”, which will walk you step by step through the whole science project process.

GET STARTED ON 24 HOUR SCIENCE PROJECTS! CLICK HERE!